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Georgia Soul Twisters - Look Out (I'm Gonna Blow Your Mind) / Mother Duck
7" Vinyl
£8.99
Digital
£1.99

Georgia Soul Twisters

Look Out (I'm Gonna Blow Your Mind) / Mother Duck

Soul7

Released: 15th June 2015 | 2 track classic r&b single

Hopelessly obscure and off the radar to even the most dedicated soul & funksters, here's a real gem of a funky soul double-sided dancer!
The Georgia Soul Twisters started out in the early '60s and were originally based out of Lyons, GA. They were led by Mose Braziel, nicknamed Pop who was the owner and manager. A 10 member touring band, they travelled and played all of the southern states, heading north when gigs presented themselves, although not always being lucrative. They would learn to follow the seasons; in the winter they headed south and then during the summer they hit the road. The band relocated to central Florida by the mid '60s. While touring in Texas the bands first 45, 'Soul Shing-a-ling Dance' b/w 'Switching Lucielle', was recorded in Dallas for the Duplex label owned by Jimmy Liggins, with whom Pop had arranged a deal. The group's second outing was 'My Love Tonight' b/w 'You Shot Me (Through the Grease)', recorded in 1967 in Tampa, FL and released by Mainstream records via Dave Crawford. The tapes were sent up to New York but Pop decided against the deal and never signed the contract. An offering of 10% per record sales and signing the band to the label for 15 years, he felt wasn't worth it. The 'Shot me Through the Grease' side did get some airplay but was pulled due to the issue with the contract, hence the stock copy being much harder to track down. Pop passed away in 1969 and the band recorded their third and final recording at a small central Florida recording studio some time in the very early '70s. 'Look Out (I'm Gonna Blow Your Mind)' b/w 'Mother Duck' was self-financed and self-released, and poor distribution means the record remains extremely elusive to this day. They continued to play into the late '70s but as members would drop out, get married and replacements became harder to recruit, they finally decided to part ways once and for all.