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Morrison Kincannon - To See One Eagle Fly
Digital
£1.99

Morrison Kincannon

To See One Eagle Fly

Spacetalk

Released: 3rd June 2016 | 2 track aor single

The crate-digging credentials of Psychemagik's Danny McLewin are well established. Even so, he's excelled himself with the first release on Spacetalk, a joint venture with Leng Records' Simon Purnell and Paul Murphy.

The trio have successfully worked together a lot over the last five years, with Purnell and Murphy releasing a string of superb collections, compiled by McLewin. All three men were keen to continue this partnership, and have founded Spacetalk to re-release long forgotten, little-known or overlooked music, as well as previously unheard archive material from some of the artists involved.

The label's first release is as obscure as they come. Morrison Kincannon's To See One Eagle Fly is stupidly rare, having initially been released by its' creators as a private press record during the early 1970s. The song was inspired by both the plight of the bald eagle, and the ongoing Watergate scandal, and was written by Norman Morrison during his senior year in High School. After friend and song writing partner Terry Kincannon worked some more on the composition, the duo recorded it with a hastily arranged band that included a number of former High School friends.

For the Spacetalk re-issue - the first commercial release of the sought-after track - To See One Eagle Fly has been re-mastered from the original 1970s multi-track master tapes, which were baked and digitised before being worked on.

To say that the song has never sounded better is an understatement. The track's rich, low-slung space-rock groove has never sounder warmer, whilst the accompanying funk-rock guitar riffs, stretched-out organ chords and hazy vocals simply sparkle.

On the flip, Paul Murphy has donned his now familiar Mudd alias to present a specially extended remix, constructed utilising the multi-track master tapes unearthed by Norman Morrison. Effortlessly emphasizing the undulating groove, fluid organs, cascading violin parts and Terry Kincannon's killer guitar solos, Murphy's brilliantly judged extension rises to an emphatic conclusion using elements from the recording session previously unheard on the original version.